Dentist Blog

Posts for: October, 2015

By Reserve Dental Group
October 20, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics  
DentalCareEarlyinLifecanImpactOralHealthinourLaterYears

Our bodies are constantly changing as we age. Although the most rapid development occurs during childhood and adolescence, our bones, soft tissue and bodily systems will continue to change, even as we enter old age.

That includes our mouth and facial structures. Over time change will result in a flatter facial profile: this will cause the nose to gain more prominence as the lower part of our face becomes shorter. The extent of our lip movement can also change with time, resulting in less of our teeth appearing when we smile. The teeth themselves will also wear, which can make them appear shorter.

These and other aging consequences should be taken into account in our dental care. We should consider their impact on the health and function of our teeth (the therapeutic aspect) and our appearance (the cosmetic aspect). Rather than less attention, the effects of aging often require a multi-layered approach to care. The foundation for this care, of course, isn’t laid when we reach our middle or later years, but with the regular and special treatments we receive when we’re young.

For example, the best time to address teeth alignment and bite is usually during early adolescence. Orthodontic treatment will certainly improve dental function and smile appearance in the short term; but improving the bite can also have implications later in life. By anticipating how the soft tissue and bone structure within the face and jaws will continue to develop, we can better determine the final teeth position we wish to achieve. This creates satisfying results in the present and a more stable platform for oral health in the future.

We can apply the same approach to other areas, like the position of the lower jaw. Using orthognathic surgery to reposition it will benefit jaw development throughout adulthood. Making these improvements can diminish the effects of aging later in life.

In essence, dental care is a life-long endeavor that begins when we’re very young and continues into our senior years. Properly caring for your teeth at any age is the key to enjoying good oral health for your entire life.

If you would like more information on the effects of aging on dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Aging Makes Beauty Timeless.”


By Reserve Dental Group
October 05, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
NewFrontTeethforaTeenagedDavidDuchovny

In real life he was a hard-charging basketball player through high school and college. In TV and the movies, he has gone head-to-head with serial killers, assorted bad guys… even mysterious paranormal forces. So would you believe that David Duchovny, who played Agent Fox Mulder in The X-Files and starred in countless other large and small-screen productions, lost his front teeth… in an elevator accident?

“I was running for the elevator at my high school when the door shut on my arm,” he explained. “The next thing I knew, I was waking up in the hospital. I had fainted, fallen on my face, and knocked out my two front teeth.” Looking at Duchovny now, you’d never know his front teeth weren’t natural. But that’s not “movie magic” — it’s the art and science of modern dentistry.

How do dentists go about replacing lost teeth with natural-looking prosthetics? Today, there are two widely used tooth replacement procedures: dental implants and bridgework. When a natural tooth can’t be saved — due to advanced decay, periodontal disease, or an accident like Duchovny’s — these methods offer good looking, fully functional replacements. So what’s the difference between the two? Essentially, it’s a matter of how the replacement teeth are supported.

With state-of-the-art dental implants, support for the replacement tooth (or teeth) comes from small titanium inserts, which are implanted directly into the bone of the jaw. In time these become fused with the bone itself, providing a solid anchorage. What’s more, they actually help prevent the bone loss that naturally occurs after tooth loss. The crowns — lifelike replacements for the visible part of the tooth — are securely attached to the implants via special connectors called abutments.

In traditional bridgework, the existing natural teeth on either side of a gap are used to support the replacement crowns that “bridge” the gap. Here’s how it works: A one-piece unit is custom-fabricated, consisting of prosthetic crowns to replace missing teeth, plus caps to cover the adjacent (abutment) teeth on each side. Those abutment teeth must be shaped so the caps can fit over them; this is done by carefully removing some of the outer tooth material. Then the whole bridge unit is securely cemented in place.

While both systems have been used successfully for decades, bridgework is now being gradually supplanted by implants. That’s because dental implants don’t have any negative impact on nearby healthy teeth, while bridgework requires that abutment teeth be shaped for crowns, and puts additional stresses on them. Dental implants also generally last far longer than bridges — the rest of your life, if given proper care. However, they are initially more expensive (though they may prove more economical in the long run), and not everyone is a candidate for the minor surgery they require.

Which method is best for you? Don’t try using paranormal powers to find out: Come in and talk to us. If you would like more information about tooth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Crowns & Bridgework,” and “Dental Implants.”


By Reserve Dental Group
October 01, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root Canal  
Find out why a root canal is really nothing to be worried about.
 
Has your Dentist, Dr. Alfred Huber at the Reserve Dental Group, told you that you need a root canal? For some, those two words areRoot Canal enough to stir panic. But we are here to tell you that a root canal is really nothing to be scared of. Knowledge is power! Find out more about your upcoming procedure so you can feel more at ease.
 
What is the purpose of a root canal?
This endodontic treatment is designed to treat problems that are affecting the dental pulp, or inside of the tooth. The dental pulp is the feeling part of the tooth, which contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissues. However, this structure is not required for your tooth to remain healthy. When the pulp becomes inflamed or infected this often causes severe pain. Damage to the pulp can occur due to infection, decay or injury. When this happens your Boca Raton, FL will recommend root canal treatment.
 
I’m scared of my upcoming root canal. What should I know about this procedure?
We can assure you that a root canal is nothing to fear. A root canal might seem invasive, but it’s really no more aggressive than having a tooth filled.
Many patients also come to us in serious pain and discomfort because of infection or decay. These patients are desperately looking for relief. Luckily, that’s exactly what a root canal provides. In fact, after the procedure is over many people report feeling instant relief from their pain.
And if you still aren’t convinced, your Dentist, at the Reserve Dental Group in Boca Raton, FL will also administer local anesthesia to the treatment area prior to your root canal. This ensures that the area is numb during your procedure and that you won’t experience any pain.
If you find that you still have questions or concerns about getting a root canal, know that your Boca Raton dentist Dr. Huber wants to make you feel as comfortable as possible. We would be happy to address any of your questions or worries. Call Reserve Dental Group, at 561-852-7773 today!